Definitions and Explanatory Notes

Definitions and Explanatory Notes

A/V Receivers:

A/V receivers are stereo receivers with video inputs/outputs, and video switching capabilities.  A/V receivers have only left and right channels- they have no surround, center, side, or rear speaker outputs.

Component Video Cables:

These cables, also known a Y-Pb-Pr, carry the picture information on three separate green, blue and red cables.  The green cable carries the luminance (B&W or Y) information, the blue cable the Y-B (luminance-blue or Pb) signal, and the red cable carries the Y-R (luminance-red or Pr) signal.  The sound is carried on two additional white and red cables, for a total of five cables.

Composite Video Cables:

Composite video is carried on a single yellow color-coded cable.  Sound is carried on separate white and red cables, for a total of three cables.  I apologize that "composite" and "component" sound so similar; it wasn't my idea...  Just remember that component cables carry separate green, blue, and red components, while the other cable carries the three colors as a composite signal.

CRT Television:

A CRT television is one with one or more traditional glass picture tubes. 

Direct-view TV's have just one picture tube, and the picture appears on the glass front of it.

JVC direct-view models start with "AV" (up to AV36).  Mitsubishi direct-view models start with AM, CK, or CS.  Sanyo direct-view CRT models begin with AVM, DS, HT, or PC.  Sharp CRT models start with the screen size (up to 36"), followed by some letters.  Sonys start with KD or KV.

Projection CRT TV's have three glass picture tubes that project on the inside of a plastic screen.  They are large, deep wooden cabinets that go all the way to the floor.

JVC projection CRT models begin with AV (AV48 and larger).  Mitsubishi projection CRT models start with TM, TS, VS, WS, or WT.  Pioneer projection CRT models start with SD, SDP, or PRO (PRO is also used for some plasma models).  Sharp CRT models start with the screen size (up to 36"), followed by some letters.  Sonys start with KDP, KP, or KPR

DLP Television:

DLP televisions look similar to old-school projection TV's, except that they are table models that do not go all the way to the floor.  They are thicker than flat-panel LCD and plasma TV's, and they contain customer-replaceable lamps.

LG/Zenith DLP models start with RU or Z, or the screen size followed by "SX" (eg. 52SX4D).  Mitsubishi DLP models start with WD or WL, except for the laser-lit models, which begin with "L."  There are no Sony DLP models.  Toshiba DLP models start with the screen size, followed by HM, HMX, or MX.

HDMI Cables:

HDMI cables carry all picture, sound, and control signals on a single digital cable with connectors that look kind of like wide USB connectors.  They supply the highest quality sound and picture, along with the ability for components to communicate with each other.

LCD Flat-Panel Television:

LCD flat-panel TV's are only a few inches thick.  Except for a few models, they have a flat finish screen that does not reflect light.  To distinguish and LCD TV from a plasma TV, press lightly on the screen.  If an odd-colored blob appears where you touch, then you have an LCD or LED TV.

JVC LCD flat-panel models begin with "LT."  They use the same designation for LED models.  LG LCD flat-panel models begin with the screen size followed by an "L" (eg. 42LH30).  Mitsubishi LCD Flat-Panel models begin with "LT."  They use the same designation for LED models.  Sanyo LCD models begin with CLT DP (DP is also used for some plasma models).  Sharp LCD models begin with LC or LCC, the same letters they use for their LED models.  Sonys begin with KDL, KLV, or NSX.

LCD Projection TV:

LCD projection TV's look similar to old-school projection TV's, except that they are table models that do not go all the way to the floor. They are thicker than flat-panel LCD and plasma TV's, but not as thick as the old projection TV's.  They also contain user-replaceable lamps.

LG/Zenith LCD projection models start with "M."  JVC LCD projection models begin with "HD."  Mitsubishi LCD projection TV models begin with WD.  Sonys begin with KDF, KDS, KDSR, KF, KFE, KL or VPL (front-projection).

LED Flat-Panel Television:

LED flat-panel TV's are the same as LCD flat-panel TV's, except that they have LED backlights instead of the fluorescent backlights used in LCD TV's.

JVC LED flat-panel models begin with the same "LT" used for their LCD models.  LG LED models currently begin with the screen size followed the letters LE, LV, or LW (eg. 42LE5400).  This may change as newer models are added.  Mitsubishi LED flat-panel models begin with the same letters "LT" used for their LCD models.  Sharp LED models begin with the same LC or LCC used for their LCD TV's.  Sony LED flat-panel models begin with KDL or NSX.

OSD (0n Screen Display):

An On-Screen Display is any text or graphics generated inside the TV.  Examples include the TV MENU, VOLUME display, INPUT display, INFO display, and so on.  For troubleshooting purposes, "OSD" does not mean a satellite or cable company's GUIDE or any text or graphics coming from a DVD, BluRay player, or VCR.

Plasma Television:

Plasma TV's are flat-panel TV's only a few inches thick.  They have glass screens that may reflect light.  To distinguish a plasma TV from an LCD flat-panel TV, press lightly on the screen.  If the picture is not affected, then you have a plasma TV.

JVC plasma models begin with "PD."  LG plasma models begin with the screen size followed by a "P" (eg. 50PK550).  Mitsubishi plasma models begin with the letters "PD."  Pioneer plasma models begin with KRP, PDP, PDPV, or PRO (PRO is also used for some CRT projection models). Sanyo plasma models start with DP or PDP (DP is also used for some LCD models).  Sharp plasma models begin with "PZ."  Sonys begin with FWD, KE, KZ, or PFM.

Refurbished Projection Lamps:

These are manufacturers' original lamp housings which are cleaned and then fitted with new glass lamps.  We do this in-house for quality control.  Refurbished lamps are sold on an exchange basis at considerable cost savings and carry the same warranty as the manufacturers' original parts.
These are not aftermarket parts, as sold on many internet sites.  Aftermarket lamp housings are poorly made and often will not fit into the set they were designed for.  We do not sell or recommend aftermarket lamps.

Surround Sound Receivers, Large and Small:

Surround Sound receivers are those with video inputs/outputs and outputs for multiple speakers.  We have separate Labor Rates and Typical Repair prices for "Large" and "Small" surround sound receivers.  Generally, "Large" receivers are those over 700 Watts of total power and over 20 pounds in weight.  To calculate the total power, take the number of channels ("5.1" means 6 channels; "7.1" means 8 channels) and multiply it by the rated power per channel, in Watts. 

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